PDA

View Full Version : The Recipe Thread


PANDAQUEEN
26th Sep 2015, 3:24 AM
So, for those wondering about my culinary endeavors, I will tell you mine and you can share yours.

Bacon Mac
Ingredients:
1 pound mild to medium cheddar cheese (I use Tillamook, but if you don't have it, use the best local brands)
5 rashers of bacon (Oscar Meyer is best. If you have personal preferences to certain brands, use that.)
1 pound elbow macaroni (Barilla's texture gives it more depth)
1 cup Panko (Japanese bread crumbs)
4 Tbsp stick butter (I recommend stick as spreads have strange effects)

Equipment:
Cheese grater
Frying pan
Large pot
Mixing spoon
Small bowl
Colander
Casserole Dish

Appliances:
Stovetop
Microwave

1.) First, grate 1 pound of the cheddar cheese and set aside.
2.) Fry the bacon until crispy. Chewy bacon won't help.
3.) Chop bacon into little pieces and set aside.
4.) Boil enough water to cook 1 pound of elbows.
5.) When it comes to a boil, add the noodles and boil for 3 minutes. Any further and you'll end up with a collapsed casserole.
6.) While the noodles are boiling, melt the 4 Tbsp of butter for 1 minute on high on a 1000W microwave. (Adjust if your wattage differs)
7.) When the butter is melted, mix the panko in.
8.) When the 3 minutes of boiling is up, drain and return to the pot.
9.) Add the bacon pieces and the cheese until melted and incorporated
10.) Transfer the casserole into the casserole dish.
11.) Place in microwave for 7 minutes.
12.) Take casserole out and serve.

VerDeTerre
26th Sep 2015, 4:20 AM
No milk? That's different. The Tillamook sounds like an interesting variation. I love how many different kinds of mac 'n cheese there are.

Zarathustra
26th Sep 2015, 4:23 AM
More food! Hooray! While I don't imagine I'll actually have that many contributions to this thread (I tend to just guesstimate things- I seldom use a recipe), I look forward to seeing all the culinary delights people share here, as well as the ones that show up in the Whatcha got Cookin thread!

VerDeTerre
26th Sep 2015, 6:42 AM
Since you started with mac 'n cheese, PANDAQUEEN, I'll have to share the mac 'n cheese my mom used to make. She used Betty Crocker's recipe mostly, with Velveeta. Later, because we all objected so much to the Velveeta, she started using Monterrey Jack. As was explained in the old Betty Crocker cookbook, mac 'n cheese was essentially a noodle pudding, which is why I was surprised that you made yours without milk, although it is perfectly fine to make it that way.

This is the mac n' cheese I would come home from school singing about. Well, actually, I would sing Yankee Doodle Dandy and after the part about Yankee Doodle sticking a feather in his hat and calling it macaroni, I would shout, "I want macaroni and cheese!". I loved my mother's - Velveeta and all, although I think it's better if made with an actual cheese and not "cheese food". Many other mac 'n cheeses are made with a cheese sauce, but this one depended on layering the ingredients and covering the assembled casserole with milk. When it came out of the oven, the top was bubbly and a little bit hard and the rest was creamy.

http://www.bettycrocker.com/recipes/moms-macaroni-and-cheese/3e25ca3c-c6f5-4a67-88a0-690ac294918b

lindali365
26th Sep 2015, 7:24 AM
This is really interesting and we could possibly end up with the 50 ways of Macaroni and Cheese. I don't remember my mom making Mac and Cheese when we were growing up but my son really liked Kraft Macaroni and Cheese (boxed). I was a working mom and sometimes caved when it came to shortcuts at mealtime. To make me feel less guilty about it, I added tuna and peas to it and he got "Macaroni and Cheese, Tuna Fish and Peas." The little brat liked the rhyme, I liked the convenience.

Now I want to make real mac and cheese. So, thank you for the recipes :)

r_deNoube
26th Sep 2015, 7:38 AM
Many other mac 'n cheeses are made with a cheese sauce, but this one depended on layering the ingredients and covering the assembled casserole with milk. ...
Doing both is also permitted. In mine, layers of mac (which can be penne, ziti, etc. etc.) alternate with layers of cheese, and where you reach the milk-pouring step, I use a mornay sauce (i.e. more cheese). If I have a sharp or crumbly cheese that doesn't melt nicely into a sauce, like some of those sheepy ones that Spaniards make, then it can go shredded into a layer. More mornay-able cheeses like medium Cheddar, Gouda, etc., participate in the sauce which carries smooth cheesiness percolating down amongst the tubes, whilst also supplying that crucial bubbling-cauldron aspect that you described. The overall policy is: good cheese and plenty of it.

Thranduil Oropherion
26th Sep 2015, 11:27 AM
I always sometimes put sausage and bacon into my mac and cheese .. it this an abomination? I believe Ms deNoube's theory wholeheartedly, "good cheese and plenty of it."

I use the same motto for wine ....

A simple dessert that is slightly iconic in New Zealand but very yummy ... and so easy a child could do it!

Ambrosia

To make your own ambrosia, you’ll need the following.

The equipment:

– A large bowl.

– An electric beater.

The main ingredients:

– A 500ml of cream. Don’t go and get light cream thinking you’re being smart, because it won’t whip properly and your ambrosia will be all sloppy. Just bite your lip and get full cream!

– 1 Ltr of yoghurt. Traditionally the recipe calls for berry yoghurt.

– Berries. Fresh are best – a punnet of strawberries, raspberries or boysenberries, or a cup of frozen mixed berries.

Additional (add all of these, or pick and choose!):

– Marshmallows. Mini marshmallows are easiest, but you can cut regular marshmallows into halves or quarters. Hint: This is a lot easier with scissors.

– Chocolate pieces. Buy chocolate chips or cut up a bar of chocolate.

– Crushed meringue. Ideally you would have made some meringue earlier on (you organised person!) but otherwise you can buy some meringue and crush it up.

– Crushed biscuit pieces. Your favourite biscuits/cookies

The method:

1. Pour the cream into the large bowl and whip.

2. Add the yoghurt, berries, and your additional bits and pieces. Try different combinations – vanilla yoghurt, crushed white chocolate cookies and raspberries for example – or just throw anything in. The more the merrier! Fold until combined.

And you’re done!

Measurements .... I didn't convert to imperial but the basic rule is half cream to yoghurt.

Personally I prefer lemon yoghurt, Oreos and crushed meringue, dark 80% cocoa solid chocolate shavings and marshmallows .. but that's just me ...

VerDeTerre
26th Sep 2015, 4:06 PM
... Must have. I'm sitting here trying to smell the screen. I'm trying to lick it.

Noubie, I love the idea of extra cheesiness. I know my son has experimented with various types of cheese in mac 'n cheese, and I've already forgotten what he said. I'll ask him today when we talk and if there's anything to add here, I'll get back to you all.

Thran and PANDA, adding meat to mac 'n cheese would make it a more hearty dish, so why not? Unless, you're a vegetarian like I am, but then some of the fake sausages and bacon make good substitutes. I actually prefer the taste of vegetarian bacon over the real thing.

Ambrosia....oh! I've never had it and it sounds wonderful!

stuart-grey
26th Sep 2015, 7:03 PM
Make bacon.

Make mac and cheese.

Eat bacon.

Throw away mac and cheese.

PANDAQUEEN
26th Sep 2015, 8:03 PM
Make bacon.

Make mac and cheese.

Eat bacon.

Throw away mac and cheese.

ARE YOU INSANE? Throwing away perfectly good Mac and cheese is a sin, and as such, I ask of a special recipe from you that you feel like sharing.

PANDAQUEEN
26th Sep 2015, 8:04 PM
No milk? That's different. The Tillamook sounds like an interesting variation. I love how many different kinds of mac 'n cheese there are.

I never used milk as the Tillamook is creamy on its own.

ScaryRob
26th Sep 2015, 8:38 PM
Rotisserie Chicken Quarters

Equipment needed: Electric tabletop turbo cooker
http://i61.tinypic.com/2hod7de.jpg

1) Season 3 or 4 thawed chicken quarters to taste
2) Cook in turbo cooker at about 400F for 50 minutes (best to follow cooker instructions for various meats)
3) Serve and enjoy

stuart-grey
26th Sep 2015, 10:50 PM
ARE YOU INSANE? Throwing away perfectly good Mac and cheese is a sin, and as such, I ask of a special recipe from you that you feel like sharing.

but... Bacon. Pure bacon!

Thranduil Oropherion
27th Sep 2015, 2:18 AM
One of the things I miss most about Ireland is the bread; particularly Irish soda bread. It's basically an unleavened bread using bicarbonate of soda and buttermilk as the raising agent. The bread is fantastic buttered with cheese or honey or smoked salmon .. or anything .. It doesn't keep well and is best eaten on the day of making, use within two days anyway ...

White Soda Bread

4 cups (16 oz) of all purpose flour
1 Teaspoon baking soda
1 Teaspoon salt
14 oz of buttermilk

Brown Soda Bread

3 cups (12 oz) of wheat flour
1 cup (4 oz) of white flour (do not use self-rising as it already contains baking powder and salt)
14 ounces of buttermilk (pour in a bit at a time until the dough is moist)
1 teaspoon of salt
1 1/2 teaspoon of bicarbonate of soda

Preheat the oven to 425 F. degrees. Lightly grease and flour a cake pan. In a large bowl sieve and combine all the dry ingredients.

Add the buttermilk to form a sticky dough. Place on floured surface and lightly knead (too much allows the gas to escape - this bit is really important, don't overwork it.)

Shape into a round flat shape in a round cake pan and cut a cross in the top of the dough (traditionally done to let the fairies escape ;))

Cover the pan with another pan and bake for 30 minutes (this simulates the traditional bastible pot). Remove cover and bake for an additional 15 minutes.

The bottom of the bread will have a hollow sound when tapped to show it is done.

Cover the bread in a tea towel and lightly sprinkle water on the cloth to keep the bread moist.

Allow to cool before cutting and enjoy!

ps .. If you can't get buttermilk .. plain, full fat yoghurt will do - or even milk that is slightly sour.

http://www.modyourpanties.com/hosting/67596_150927002331irish_soda_bread2.jpg

lindali365
27th Sep 2015, 2:59 AM
I love Irish Soda Bread! I make it at least 6 times a year, but I add raisins to mine. The next day it's so good with apricot or red raspberry preserves.

If I want to make it vegan for my son, I pour a couple of tablespoons of white vinegar into a liquid measuring cup, then add almond milk to equal the required amount of milk. Let it sit for at least a few minutes before adding it to the flour mixture. The vinegar curdles the milk (not sure if that's the proper word, but it thickens it to resemble something like buttermilk. You don't taste the vinegar). I also use vegan margarine because the recipe I've been using calls for 3 tablespoons butter/margarine.

Will try your recipe next time T.O. :)

Thranduil Oropherion
27th Sep 2015, 3:06 AM
I love Irish Soda Bread! I make it at least 6 times a year, but I add raisins to mine. The next day it's so good with apricot or red raspberry preserves.

If I want to make it vegan for my son, I pour a couple of tablespoons of white vinegar into a liquid measuring cup, then add almond milk to equal the required amount of milk. Let it sit for at least a few minutes before adding it to the flour mixture. The vinegar curdles the milk (not sure if that's the proper word, but it thickens it to resemble something like buttermilk. You don't taste the vinegar). I also use vegan margarine because the recipe I've been using calls for 3 tablespoons butter/margarine.

Will try your recipe next time T.O. :)
I'd really happy someone has heard of it!
Wow, that's useful about the almond milk and vinegar, I'll remember that :)
My Great-aunt used to add raisins or sultanas to hers too, especially on a Sunday for a treat when I was little .. I can still taste it ;)
I prefer the brown version with seafood or cold cuts .. or better yet, seafood chowder or leek and potato soup..

r_deNoube
27th Sep 2015, 3:13 AM
Linda -- @lindali365 the Space Pony! -- yes, curdles is the right word. The result is curds: under acidic conditions, a protein solidifies and comes out of solution and that's what you see as the little thick places.

When you use actual buttermilk, is your proportion of buttermilk to baking soda about what @Thranduil Oropherion stated? The reason I ask is that the word "buttermilk" might not mean quite the same thing everywhere. I hope the kind that North Americans have on store shelves is close to what Irish and New Zealanders have, but I don't really know my buttermilk.

lindali365
27th Sep 2015, 3:16 AM
You can use the vinegar trick with any kind of milk and the results should be the same. The brown version will open a whole new soda bread world for us, sounds delish with the seafood or cold cuts and soups/chowders!

Thranduil Oropherion
27th Sep 2015, 3:20 AM
Linda -- @lindali365 the Space Pony! -- yes, curdles is the right word. The result is curds: under acidic conditions, a protein solidifies and comes out of solution and that's what you see as the little thick places.

When you use actual buttermilk, is your proportion of buttermilk to baking soda about what @Thranduil Oropherion stated? The reason I ask is that the word "buttermilk" might not mean quite the same thing everywhere. I hope the kind that North Americans have on store shelves is close to what Irish and New Zealanders have, but I don't really know my buttermilk.

I think you may have a point there, Ms deNoube .. I'll clarify what I mean by buttermilk .. here is the best definition I can find:
"Traditional or old-fashioned buttermilk is the liquid left over after churning butter. During the traditional butter making process, milk was left to sit, sometimes up to a day, to allow the butterfat to separate from the milk. During that time, bacteria naturally found in the milk would proliferate and ferment the milk’s lactose. Lactic acid, which is the byproduct of lactose fermentation, gives buttermilk its characteristic tangy flavor."

Also I looked for a traditional buttermilk substitute and find that lindali365's trick with the vinegar (or lemon juice) is probably the best.

lindali365
27th Sep 2015, 3:29 AM
Linda -- @lindali365 the Space Pony! -- yes, curdles is the right word. The result is curds: under acidic conditions, a protein solidifies and comes out of solution and that's what you see as the little thick places.

When you use actual buttermilk, is your proportion of buttermilk to baking soda about what @Thranduil Oropherion stated? The reason I ask is that the word "buttermilk" might not mean quite the same thing everywhere. I hope the kind that North Americans have on store shelves is close to what Irish and New Zealanders have, but I don't really know my buttermilk.

Ahh, thank you for that explanation about curdling, acids and proteins. Sounds like chemistry madness! :D

The recipe I've been using calls for 1 cup buttermilk (8 fl. oz.) to 1 teaspoon baking soda + 1 teaspoon baking powder. @Thranduil Oropherion 's description of buttermilk sounds spot on.

mustluvcatz
27th Sep 2015, 6:33 AM
I've only understood one thing in this whole thread so far and that's:

http://www.modyourpanties.com/hosting/67604_150927043211baconoriginal.jpg
Yes, that's right - BACONNNNNNNNNNNNNN!

stuart-grey
27th Sep 2015, 6:30 PM
I've only understood one thing in this whole thread so far and that's:

http://www.modyourpanties.com/hosting/67604_150927043211baconoriginal.jpg
Yes, that's right - BACONNNNNNNNNNNNNN!
Bacon is a health food! :rofl:

Really, I used to make all kinds of baked goods. All my recipes were out of an OLD Betty Crocker cook book. The new BC Cook books are all politically correct recipes that would kill me pretty dead if I ate them, though the old book was bad enough. It gave me type II diabetes. I'd love to eat that Irish Soda Bread; it is much like the biscuits I used to make, only bigger. I also was famous for pies - apple and pumpkin pies were my speciality. And beer-rocks and meat pies and meat tarts...

Now, Bacon... it's human food. Fat and protein! You can't get fat eating fat. Eating fat won't make you skinny, tho. I think of all the things I can't eat but Bacon... it keeps me sane.

Mistermook
27th Sep 2015, 7:00 PM
I'm actually not a big fan of bacon. If I want pork fat in my life I'm so much happier with a nice slow cooked pork roast of some sort, strangled for six or seven hours on low heat until it gives up any resemblance of resistance and falls off the bone without prompting.

PANDAQUEEN
27th Sep 2015, 10:46 PM
While we're on the subject of pig meats, my father has this crazy belief than the first burned animal sacrifices were God's way of barbecue as he was the first pitmaster.

Don't give my dad too much credence, he's from a family of Catholic screwballs that engage in nightly pun-offs at dinner and sadly, I am one of them.

I actually have a "gummy bear using Jell-O and Knox" recipe. I need to get it off my phone.

mustluvcatz
27th Sep 2015, 11:22 PM
I'm actually not a big fan of bacon. If I want pork fat in my life I'm so much happier with a nice slow cooked pork roast of some sort, strangled for six or seven hours on low heat until it gives up any resemblance of resistance and falls off the bone without prompting.

I do like bacon, just not as much as I make it seem. My absolute favorite pork fat is the fat on a good pork chop - when you let it get slightly burnt, but not to the point of "tastes like charcoal" burnt. If someone were to serve me a pork chop and then want to take it back, I'd have to cry and ask them if I could just have the fat off of it. That's how much I like it.

/me promises the next time I post in this thread I'll have a recipe to share.. but forewarns that any measurements would be guesstimates since I don't measure anything unless I'm baking something. :)

PANDAQUEEN
28th Sep 2015, 7:46 PM
Homemade Gummi Bears

Ingredients:
*1 3oz box of Jell-O, any flavor
*4 packets or 2 Tbsp Knox Unflavored Gelatine
*A squirt of corresponding Mio Flavor Enhancer for water
*4oz cold water
*6oz boiling water

Equipment:
*A small sauce pan
*Spatula
*a turkey baster and eye dropper
*a heavy glass
*a gummi bear mold for the gelatin mix
*a sheet pan.

Note
(I know some of the ingredients and equipment are off kilter, but let me explain in order: My first attempt turned out bland, so the local housewives suggested I use Mio to help with the flavor and it works! The boiling water clarifies the gelatin, giving it a jeweled appearance. The turkey baster and eye dropper are for loading the gelatin into the molds and it is size dependent. The sheet pan is for the support and stabilization of the molds during the time it is filled and chilled.)

Steps
1. First, mix the gelatins, flavored and unflavored, with the cold water in the small saucepan.
2. Put on medium heat the mixture and dissolve granules of gelatin.
3. Take off heat and add 1-2 squirts of Mio.
4. Using water boiled on a kettle, pour into mixture and stir.
5. Using a turkey baster or a dropper, fill the cavities of the molds. If made of silicone, use a metal baking sheet to steady the molds.
6. Making sure the baking sheet can fit, put the molds into the fridge, never the freezer, and chill overnight.
7. Pop out the bears and keep in airtight container for up to one week.

P.S. This recipe can be doubled or tripled

ScaryRob
28th Sep 2015, 7:57 PM
Vodka Tonic:

1 part vodka
3 parts tonic water
Serve "on the rocks", stirred (not shaken)
Garnish with a slice of lime or lemon

mustluvcatz
3rd Oct 2015, 8:25 PM
I thought of something that doesn't involve measuring anything, just cooking some hamburger (or ground turkey.. my personal choice) and opening some cans. If you don't already know - I love chili, at least my own chili. So here's how I make mine.

1 lb ground turkey (or ground beef if you like it)
2 cans mild chili beans - do not drain, the liquid in them is what flavors the chili
1 can red kidney beans - rinse well, this gets rid of a lot of that gas-inducing part of the beans!
1 large can crushed tomatoes
1 small box/can tomato sauce (completely optional but see my note about the one I use)
half a green pepper (size doesn't matter and you can use more or less) - diced
half an onion (same as the green pepper)

In a large pan, cook the ground turkey/beef - if you'd like, you can add the diced green pepper and onion now. (I do - that way I don't have to cook the chili longer just to cook those. When I want chili, I want it as fast as possible!) If you used ground beef, drain the fat and return it to the pan. (No, I don't drain ground turkey. There's never a lot of liquid after it's cooked and it's not fatty. If I need to get rid of some liquid in it I just turn the heat up and it basically evaporates.. it's like magic, lol.)
Add the rest of the ingredients and let simmer for half an hour or so. Doesn't take long - if you didn't add the green peppers and onions at the beginning, you'll need to let it simmer until those are tender. If you like your chili thinner you can add some water to it or extra crushed tomatoes or tomato sauce. We like ours thicker. (We also like it with shredded cheddar cheese and sour cream!)

Note about the tomato sauce - I sometimes (if I remember to buy it) use a boxed tomato sauce from Wal-Mart. I get it from the Mexican section of their idea of an ethnic section. I can't remember the name of it but it's a small black box. It's just tomato sauce with some added spices but I like it because it adds a little something to the taste of the chili.

So - there's the chili I love so much. Super easy and tasty - ALSO, not too spicy at all. I don't add spices of any kind to it - the liquid in the chili beans is enough for me. I have added some cumin in the past (probably about a teaspoon) and that tastes good too, but you don't have to add it.

grammapat
5th Oct 2015, 9:22 PM
Fluffy Lemon No-Bake Cheesecake

You will need:
[list]
15 digestive biscuits, crushed but not too finely. (Apparently Graham Crackers are a common substitute in the US/Canada, but you may find them in an ethnic food section?)

Definitely worth making as it tastes amazing!! I'm thinking of trying gingernut biscuits as a base soon :bunny:

Graham crackers are common here (US) and are used for smores and pie crusts; I would think vanilla cookies would be a better, neutral, flaver ...they are a round, crisp, thin cookie...I don't really know what "digestives" are, but thought they were something WE would call a cookie...and I thought they were chocolate...? No wait, you call cookies "biskits" -? For us, bicuits are a bread, dropped rather than rolled and cut.
"ginger snap" cookies sound like the "biscuits" you mentioned...they are used here for pie crusts too. Great for pumpkin pies (or a southern favorite, sweet potato pie. I worked on a recipe for years, and my recipes are all gone! :cry: )

tsyokawe
5th Oct 2015, 9:52 PM
@pizza

For flavor and texture, I would totally go with crushing graham crackers for a substitute base for that cheesecake (with maybe a drop or two of water...maybe)

tsyokawe
5th Oct 2015, 10:15 PM
They're very good slathered with chocolate frosting!

Here in the colonies, we like to make sandwiches of Hershey's chocolate, roasted (and very melty) marshamallows, and graham crackers. Messy, but very good.

But my favorite is to spread warm chocolate frosting on a graham cracker. It's perfect with black, unsweetened coffee to drink.

mustluvcatz
5th Oct 2015, 10:33 PM
What's better than chocolate frosting on a graham cracker? Hershey's Chocolate with Almond Spread on a graham cracker. Better yet? A Hershey's Chocolate with Almond Spread & graham cracker sandwich. (And that's coming from someone who really has no use or desire for those flavored spreads. But we had a jar of it, we had a box of graham crackers, I wanted something sweet so... try it, you'll like it!)

tsyokawe
5th Oct 2015, 10:38 PM
omg. I LOVE almonds. I've never even heard of this. We have one particular grocery store here in town that is stocked with all sorts of stuff. Rosauers.
I'm gonna have to see if they have this. Otherwise, I'll have to find it online.

Almonds give just the right bit of ... bitterness? with their nuttiness. I hesitate to use the word, 'bitter,' but it's something akin to that, but in a wonderful way.

I love almonds. I used to chop them up, and put them in my fudge.

ETA: heeeee. I've found it online. I am going to go inside a Walmart store. They sell it there.

Thranduil Oropherion
5th Oct 2015, 10:44 PM
@pizza - the closest thing we have to Graham crackers is plain digestive biscuits .. I always use them for my cheesecake base .. when I can be arsed to make it ;) I want to try your recipe though - sounds yummy :lovestruc

Zarathustra
5th Oct 2015, 11:09 PM
Graham crackers work well for something more substantial like the chocolate/mint cheescake that I love, but for a lighter flavor like a lemon cheesecake, Nilla Wafers are what I tend to use, and what I would recommend for aspiring US-based cheescake chefs.

Thranduil Oropherion
5th Oct 2015, 11:24 PM
Interesting thought about a vanilla base - but I prefer the slight saltiness of the digestive biscuit with any cheesecake and with lemon it's a marriage made in Heaven. It's not over sweet and nor does it detract from the lemony flavour - each to their own I suppose, but in Europe, we prefer a more neutral and less sweet combination with lemon I believe.

tsyokawe
5th Oct 2015, 11:30 PM
I've made plain cheesecake. My father's mother did, as well. It is delicious with graham crackers. In my humble opinion, the graham does not overpower the lightness of the cheesecake.

I once tried Nilla Wafers (in 1979, actually). The problem with Nilla Wafers is that they are too...soggy, they don't have the body necessary. (Again, this would be one cook's opinion.)

Perhaps if there is something vanilla-ey that maintains its body and crunch? Maybe a vanilla cone? I would consider that as a pleasant alternative.
But for me, a classic light and/or plain cheesecake calls for graham crackers! :P :rofl: :p.

@Zarathustra

To your post below (I feel like I'm spamming this thread, so I'm adding my comments here):

I wonder if putting the crumbled cookies in an oven on VERY low heat for an hour might dry them up enough to make them not soften too much under the pour?
I mean, that never occurred to me back then....

Thranduil brought up a good point. Nilla Wafers are very sweet, so depending on personal taste, a person might decide to back off a bit on the sugar for the cheesecake itself. :bunny:

Zarathustra
5th Oct 2015, 11:38 PM
I once tried Nilla Wafers (in 1979, actually). The problem with Nilla Wafers is that they are too soggy, they don't have the body necessary. (Again, this would be one cook's opinion.)

I'm pretty sure the box of Nilla Wafers I've been using is about that old, actually... the new ones may not have dried out so much, and might not actually work so well... I'll have to buy new ones whenever I make my next cheescake, and see!

It's October now though, and that means PIE!!! :D

lindali365
6th Oct 2015, 3:48 PM
We went to a farm market yesterday and bought a variety of winter squash, fresh farm tomatoes, pumpkin butter, apples and caramel apple dip (sinfully good). So, today I'm using butternut squash and apples in this recipe.

Butternut-Apple Casserole

Squash Mixture:
3 cups cooked and mashed butternut squash
1/4 cup butter or margarine, softened
1 tablespoon light brown sugar

Apples:
6 cups peeled, cored and sliced apples
1 1/2 tablespoons butter or margarine
1/8 to 1/4 cup granulated sugar, according to sweetness preference

Topping (combine):
1 1/2 cups corn flake crumbs
1/2 cup chopped pecans or walnuts
2 tablespoons butter or margarine, softened
1/2 cup light brown sugar

- Prepare topping, set aside.
- Combine mashed squash, softened butter and 1 tablespoon brown sugar; set aside.
- Saute apples in butter until tender. Sprinkle with 1/8 to 1/4 cup granulated sugar, according to taste.
- Spread apples in the bottom of a casserole dish. Spoon in the squash mixture, smooth, then sprinkle the topping over the squash.
- Bake at 350 degrees F. for 15 minutes, or until the topping is golden brown and the casserole is heated.

http://i1283.photobucket.com/albums/a550/Linda114/Food/Btrnt-Apl%20Cass2_zpscy3pbahv.jpg

* This is an easy recipe that adapts well to changes. If you like more squash, add more squash. Not crazy about so many apples, add less, Sworn off butter, don't use it (but you might want to add a little to the topping to help with browning), you can add a sprinkle of cinnamon to the apple mixture, use more or less sugars, add less topping, etc.
* Today I mashed 3 butternut squash and ended up with a lot. I like more squash than apples in this recipe. I sliced 5 apples and ended up with about 5 cups.
* I'm going to toast/roast the squash seeds for a crunchy snack.

ETA: I just came across this Wikipedia article that shows equivalents for English terms used for foods and ingredients (USA, Canada, UK, Australia).
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_English_food_terms

grammapat
7th Oct 2015, 3:16 AM
Graham crackers work well for something more substantial like the chocolate/mint cheescake that I love, but for a lighter flavor like a lemon cheesecake, Nilla Wafers are what I tend to use, and what I would recommend for aspiring US-based cheescake chefs.

Those are the vanilla cookies I mentioned.
lindali - thanks for that link for that "foreign" language

Zarathustra
29th Oct 2015, 2:45 AM
I am reasonably certain that, with having accidentally spilled the nutmeg on my recipe for banana bread, that recipe is now stained with EVERY SINGLE ingredient on it!

Mmmm... banana bread...

1 c. whole wheat flour
1 c. unbleached flour
1 tsp. baking powder
1/2 c. (1 stick) butter
1 c. brown sugar
1/2 c. chopped walnuts
1 egg
3 tbsp. milk
1 c. mashed bananas (2 bananas)
1/2 tsp. baking soda
1/2 tsp cinnamon and/or nutmeg

Cream butter and sugar together and add beaten egg. Dissolve baking soda in milk and stir in the mashed banana. Add this to the butter/sugar mixture and mix in flours, spices, and baking powder. Fold in nuts and pour into a greased loaf pan. Bake ~40 minutes at 350 degrees, or until it springs back gently.