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~MadameButterfly~
4th Jan 2016, 12:12 PM
http://i.imgur.com/JSG95vL.jpg

Welcome to the Grand Library of the Receptacle Refugees.

This thread is where we can talk about our favorite books, our cherished authors, give suggestions, or even ask around for reading suggestions. Basically, anything related to the world of books is fair game in here. When suggesting a book, please include the title, author, and ISBN number if possible.

~MadameButterfly~
4th Jan 2016, 12:14 PM
I'll start with a suggestion request. What would you all suggest for me? For the most part, these days I am into fantasy, mystery, and sci-fi. A few of the kinds of authors who are in my personal collection, in no specific order, are:
.
.

Terry Pratchett (I have pretty much everything of his work)
Frank Herbert (The Dune series)
Philip Pullman
Isaac Asimov
Jasper Fforde
Anne Perry
Christopher Paolini
Ursula K. Le Guin
L. Frank Baum
Sue Grafton
J.R.R. Tolkien

Don Babilon
4th Jan 2016, 1:14 PM
For fantasy I recommend Fritz Leiber. The series of adventures of Fafhrd and the Gray Mouser (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fafhrd_and_the_Gray_Mouser) influenced many later fantasy writers and the city of Lankhmar is the precursor of Ankh Morpork.
Another founding figure of fantasy is Lord Dunsany (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_Plunkett,_18th_Baron_of_Dunsany). Reading The Gods of Pegana (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Gods_of_Pegāna), The Book of Wonder (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Book_of_Wonder) or other collections of his stories is like reading the language source book for any following writer in high fantasy - Tolkien, C.S. Lewis and Le Guin in particular.

One of the weirdest and most beautiful books that is not fantasy but influenced many fantasy writers is the national epic of Finland Kalevala (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kalevala). You will recognise a lot of motifs there that went into the Silmarillion and The Lord of the Rings, especially the elf magic and the primal gods who create the world in song. (interesting note: my spell check has Silmarillion in its dictionary)

A sort of meta work on fantasy I can also recommend is The Dictionary of Imaginary Places (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Dictionary_of_Imaginary_Places).

~MadameButterfly~
4th Jan 2016, 1:29 PM
Very good suggestions, across the board, thank-you! I am particularly interested in the first one (Fritz Leiber), so I think I'll start with him. I'm curious about Lankhmar.

***

Swords and Deviltry (Fafhrd and the Gray Mouser Book 1)
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Swords and Deviltry, the first book of Leiberís landmark series, introduces us to a strange world where our two strangers find the familiar in themselves and discover the icy power of female magic. Three master-magician femme fatales and a sprightly lad illuminate the bonds between father and son, the relationship between the bravado of the imagination and the courage of fools. A hedge wizard explains the cold war between the sexes. Mouse and Fafhrd meet again and learn the truth of how Mouse became the Gray Mouser. Together they traverse the smoke and mirrors of Lankhmar learning more and more of the foggy world in which they live, mapping the sinister silent symptoms of the never-ending night smog. They follow the night smogís relation to the regionís longing for larceny and the hazy opiate of vanity. Last but certainly not least, they experience the pleasures and pains of the City of Sevenscore Thousand Smokers that will lead them to countless more adventures and misadventures.

http://amzn.com/B00J90EZIA

lisfyre
4th Jan 2016, 4:57 PM
Melanie Rawn - The Sunrunner Series (Dragon Prince and Dragon Star Trilogies - I just looked it up) - 6 books, The Exiles Series
David Eddings - The Belgariad Series,, The Mallorean Series, The Elenium Series, The Tamuli Series - Oh hell all his fantasy books.
Raymond E. Feist - All of The Riftwar Saga - 30 books

~MadameButterfly~
4th Jan 2016, 5:07 PM
Thank-you very much, Lisfyre! I just looked them all up. So many books! :lovestruc

lisfyre
4th Jan 2016, 6:13 PM
MB, not enough books :) LOL :) For Christmas I got the Hunger Games trilogy, The Divergent Series - 4 books, The Mortal Instruments Series - 5 books. Already plowed thru Hunger Games and Divergent and about to finish up The Mortal Instruments. I'm a really fast reader :)

~MadameButterfly~
4th Jan 2016, 6:17 PM
Some say that the bookshelf is half empty, and some say that the bookshelf is half full...

LOL!

SusannaG
4th Jan 2016, 6:50 PM
Uprooted, by Naomi Novik. Fantasy set in eastern Europe, based on Polish fairy tales. Also, if you like the concept of "the Napoleonic wars with dragons," try out her Temeraire novels. The first of those is His Majesty's Dragon.

Ancillary Justice, Ancillary Sword, Ancillary Mercy, by Ann Leckie. Science fiction trilogy.

The "Three Pines" novels of Louise Penny, mysteries set in rural Quebec, for the most part. The first is Still Life.

~MadameButterfly~
4th Jan 2016, 7:01 PM
Thank-you SusannaG! All of yours selections sound very good, too, but I got the tingles when reading your last recommendation. I think it calls me.

Scobre
4th Jan 2016, 7:16 PM
My favorite book is Pride and Prejudice. I love the Lord Peter Wimsey series by Dorothy L. Sayers. Mary Higgins Clark and Diane Mott Davidson's books I enjoy reading too. Of course besides the mystery books I like the classics from William Shakespeare, Mark Twain, Charles Dickens, Edgar Allen Poe, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Jane Austen, Agatha Christie, Emily Dickinson, Charlotte Bront√ę, Lewis Carroll, and Dr. Seuss.

Kimlupai
4th Jan 2016, 9:58 PM
Pride & Prejudice is one of my favourite books too and Jane Austen is my favourite author. Have you ever tried any of the monster mash-ups? They're total candy floss for the brain but can be entertaining. One I particularly like is Pride & Platypus, it's just so ridiculous. A bit more gruesome but still fun is the Pride & Prejudice & Zombies Trilogy. One book of the trilogy was made into a film not too long ago.

If you're into fantasy/urban fantasy, Jim Butcher's Dresden Files are brilliant. My particular favourite was the novel where Harry Dresden re-animated a T-Rex skeleton and rode it to battle through the city centre. Well if you're going to re-animate a skeleton, you might as well do it properly. First book in the series - Storm Front.

There's also a urban fantasy series by Rob Thurman the main characters are the Leandros brothers, one of whom is half "monster". It's interesting seeing how he deals with this and how he changes throughout the series. It's a pretty gritty series and gets more so as it progresses. The first book is called Nightlife. The author's website is http://robthurman.net/new/the-cal-leandros-novels/

Another great author is Nalini Singh. She's done (and is still working on) a wonderful series about the psy/changeling/human world. Each book focuses on a couple getting together but also carries on the story arc. The basic idea is of a world (ours sort of) where there are three races. The Psy, who have psychic powers such as telepathy, telekinesis etc, they all link into the psy-net and die if they aren't connected. They live under a protocol called 'silence' whereby they are conditioned not to feel any emotions. The changelings, they are animal shifters so you have packs of wolf shifters, leopard shifters etc etc and finally plain humans. The story so far has followed a major shift in society as the Psy have to realise that their silence protocol is causing more problems than it's solving and the changelings become more organised and powerful. Her website: http://nalinisingh.com/books/psychangeling-series/slave-to-sensation/

Nalini Singh also has another series Guild Hunter, I've only read a couple of short stories from that but I have all the books on my kindle as it looks as though it's going to be another good series.

A slightly more old fashioned series, is Modesty Blaise by Peter O'Donnell. She started out as a daily comic strip in newspapers but Peter O'Donnell wrote several full length novels, plus some short stories. A publisher has now collected all the comic strips together and is gradually releasing them in a series of books. Modesty Blaise can sort of be compared to James Bond in that she does occasionally work for the secret service but she and her partner Willie Garvin manage to get into all sorts of trouble by themselves. They also don't rely on gadgets like James Bond, it's their quick wits that get them out of trouble most of the time along with their fighting skills. One thing I particularly like, they are human, they are shown learning and practising those skills. They might have a talent but they work hard to hone it. http://www.amazon.co.uk/Peter-ODonnell/e/B000APFINY/ref=sr_ntt_srch_lnk_2?qid=1451937298&sr=1-2

Other authors I particularly like:
Patricia Briggs - Urban Fantasy. Mercy Thompson series
Charlaine Harris - True blood.
Kim Harrison - Urban fantasy The Hollows series. First book - Dead Witch Walking
Cassandra Gannon - Ebooks only. Love in the Time of Zombies. Vampire Charming. Not Another Vampire Book. Cowboy from the Future. Wicked Ugly Bad and various others. I find them hilarious.
Meljean Brook - Steam Punk. Iron Seas series. First full length novel - The Iron Duke
Robin McKinley - Fantasy. Most of her books but particularly Deerskin (some people might find this one disturbing - abusive parents and rape), Beauty. Rose Daughter. Both retell the Beauty & the Beast story. Spindle's End retelling of Sleeping Beauty.
Bec McMaster - Steam Punk. London Steam punk series. First book - Kiss of Steel.
Gail Carriger - Not traditional fantasy, not urban fantasy, not quite sure what to call it. The Parasol Protectorate series. First book - Soulless.
Lisa Shearin - Fantasy. Raine Benares series. First book - Magic Lost, Trouble Found. Also the SPI Files. First book - The Grendel Affair.
Lois McMaster Bujold - Space opera/Sci Fi. Vorkosigan Saga.
Mercedes Lackey - Fantasy, best known for her Valdemar series but she's got some other good ones. Personally I prefer her earlier books, the latest aren't quite up to her past standard but are still good.

Elizabeth Peters - Historical mystery - read it for the characters, they're great. First book in the series Crocodile on the Sandbank
Ngaio Marsh - Agatha Christie style writer, her protagonist is Inspector Alleyn

Patricia Cornwell - Modern murder - Well known for Kay Scarpetta series. First book - Postmortem. Loved the early books in the series, later books got a little too political for my tastes.
Linda Fairstein - Modern murder - Alexandra Cooper series. First book - Final Jeopardy.
Kathy Reichs - Modern murder - Temperance Brennan series - Deja Dead. TV series Bones was inspired by this author, although it used the character's name but that's about it.

I'm not sure if this would be useful for anyone but I use the website Good Reads. You put in the books you read, rate them and the website will offer recommendations based on what you've read. It's also a really useful resource for finding the next book in a series, or giving you the reading order of a series. You can also read the reviews from other readers which may or may not be useful.

I also signed up to the Bookbub website which is useful if you have an ebook reader. Tell Bookbub what genres of books you like and it will email you every day with a selection of ebooks that are free or heavily discounted on the major ebook selling sites. Can be dangerous however, in the 'Unread' folder on my kindle I now have 109 books. The positive side is that it has let me try loads of authors for free. The not so good side is that some of these authors are not so good - but they were free.

Sorry I got a bit carried away so I'll stop now.

~MadameButterfly~
4th Jan 2016, 10:08 PM
You are completely fine! I love your passion, awesome selections, and tips! Wow!

arathea
4th Jan 2016, 10:23 PM
Charlotte MacLeod - the Balaclava and Boston mystery series
Lilian Jackson Braun - The cat who... mysteries
Rita Mae Brown & Sneaky Pie Brown - the Mrs. Murphy mysteries
Alan Bradley - Flavia de Luce mysteries

Michael Ende - The neverending story (much better than the movies IMO) and Momo
Robert Rankin - madness galore, especially the Brentford Triology in *counts* at least nine books

Kimlupai
4th Jan 2016, 10:27 PM
After writing all that, I forgot to include another amazing writer. This one writes historical murder mystery set in Tudor times. The books are amazing, they give you a real feel for what life might have been like back then. They're not sanitised at all, the filth in the streets, the smells, sounds and attitudes are all right there but presented in such a way that they add to the story instead of distracting from it. The author is C J Sansom and the series is the Matthew Shardlake series. They're quite hefty books but definitely worth reading if you're at all interested in Tudor Britain, come to think of it, if you're not interested they're still worth a look.
Dissolution
Dark Fire
Sovereign
Revelation
Heart Stone
Lamentation

arathea
4th Jan 2016, 10:37 PM
I forgot another mystery series:
Ellis Peters - The Cadfael Chronicles

Pary
4th Jan 2016, 10:41 PM
Melanie Rawn - The Sunrunner Series (Dragon Prince and Dragon Star Trilogies - I just looked it up) - 6 books, The Exiles Series
David Eddings - The Belgariad Series,, The Mallorean Series, The Elenium Series, The Tamuli Series - Oh hell all his fantasy books.
Raymond E. Feist - All of The Riftwar Saga - 30 books

Eddings and Feist are my two favourites as well !
Magician was the first fantasy novel I ever read when I was about 14 or 15 and to this day it remains my all time favourite.

SusannaG
4th Jan 2016, 11:07 PM
You'll find me on both GoodReads and BookLikes.

The Shardlakes are not only the best historical mysteries I've ever read, but some of the best historical novels.

Scobre
4th Jan 2016, 11:58 PM
Pride & Prejudice is one of my favourite books too and Jane Austen is my favourite author. Have you ever tried any of the monster mash-ups? They're total candy floss for the brain but can be entertaining. One I particularly like is Pride & Platypus, it's just so ridiculous. A bit more gruesome but still fun is the Pride & Prejudice & Zombies Trilogy. One book of the trilogy was made into a film not too long ago.

I haven't yet. I'll have to check it out. Thank you for the suggestions.

lisfyre
5th Jan 2016, 12:05 AM
Eddings and Feist are my two favourites as well !
Magician was the first fantasy novel I ever read when I was about 14 or 15 and to this day it remains my all time favourite.
With JRRTolkien at the top of course. I've read The Hobbit, The Lord of the Rings Trilogy, and The Silmarillion - and reread this lot once a year. So sad that Eddings died and there will be no more stories from him. I read his last series - The Dreamers and enjoyed that. I wish there were more but hey.. I reread them almost every year. Also sad about Feist because he has basically said that Magician's End is the last book he's publishing. However, if you read the book... there's a back door open to continue it. I'm hoping .... ~~fingers crossed~~

arathea
5th Jan 2016, 1:09 AM
I just found out that one of my favourite German books got translated into English, so here it comes:

Walter Moers - The 13 1/2 lives of Captain Bluebear

Pary
5th Jan 2016, 1:27 AM
I think I must be the only person in the world who doesn't really like to read Tolkien ( Please don't stone me ! ) I find him rather long winded, and I have never been able to get past the first half of the LOTR trilogy.
I was sad when Eddings died. His books were so captivating. I'm still holding out hope for Feist, even though I haven't finished all 30 books yet. No series in the world has ever sucked me in as much as his Riftwar Saga. It's become my measuring stick for any fantasy novel I read now. My original books have pages falling out, and the covers are faded, simply from reading and rereading over so many years.
I don't really want to replace them but I know I am going to have to sooner or later.

Another series I enjoyed reading immensely was Diana Gabaldon's Outlander series. Cross Stitch, as the first book is known over here, was one my mother loaned me when it first came out, and I never gave it back. I ended up keeping the original for its cover art, and buying her a new one to replace it in the end, along with the rest of the series. They're terrific books.

~MadameButterfly~
5th Jan 2016, 1:59 AM
I enjoyed the LOTR, but the Silmarillion kept knocking me out. Although, that's probably because I have that one as an audio book. I think I did finally get through it, I think, but I can barely remember it. If I were to listen to it again, I would be at risk of falling asleep again.

Pary
5th Jan 2016, 2:17 AM
I'm having that "invisible last post" problem again.

tangie0906
5th Jan 2016, 2:33 AM
Wow! If I disappear for awhile, I am probably wandering around in a trance in the Grand Library. :-o

I loved the LOTR and The Hobbit back when I read them. I haven't tried re-reading them, but sometimes it's not the same again. I loved The Chronicles of Thomas Covenant when I read them many years ago; not without flaws but at the time I thought it was fantastic. I should try to re-read them one of these days to see how I feel about them now. I also loved The Outlander series too, but at some point I think I got burned out and stopped reading them. Not sure which book flipped the switch. Another favorite of mine that no one has mentioned is The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy.

Out of all the suggestions here, the first one I'm looking up is the Matthew Shardlake series. That sounds like a great read.

lisfyre
9th Jan 2016, 4:23 PM
I think I must be the only person in the world who doesn't really like to read Tolkien ( Please don't stone me ! ) I find him rather long winded, and I have never been able to get past the first half of the LOTR trilogy.
Tolkien is one of those writers that you can read easily or that you can plod along. I guess it's the writing style of the era? Not sure but when I first started reading The Hobbit, I couldn't get thru it cause it was so "long-winded" I just said meh.. and put it down. That was in Grade 9. By Grade 11, I was plowing thru it and had to re-read it to make sure I hadn't missed anything. Now I just automatically re-read it because I love the story. When the films came out, I did a lot of re-reading because of certain scenes that were out of sync with the books and some added scenes that I didn't recognize.

Now Robert Jordan on his Wheel of Time series.. I got thru the first 2 books ok then book 3 started just slowing down for me and I barely got thru it. I couldn't even try book 4 and to this day I haven't attempted to re-read any of this books.

SusannaG
9th Jan 2016, 9:58 PM
I love Tolkien, but the Silmarillion is a slog. (My mother, amusingly, *hates* Tolkien. Whose scholarly work she was forced to read in grad school. She hears "Tolkien" and shudders.)

~MadameButterfly~
9th Jan 2016, 10:39 PM
Well, at least I am not the only one who thinks that about that book. :D

Don Babilon
9th Jan 2016, 11:12 PM
I don't think that the Silmarillion was ever intended as a book for entertainment. It was posthumously pieced together by Tolkien's son and I think it is rather an exercise on what Tolkien termed mythopoetic writing. It's written like ancient epics or scripture.

~MadameButterfly~
9th Jan 2016, 11:24 PM
If that's the case, it sounds like he used it to help establish his world. That is the thought that I remember having while listening to it.

Don Babilon
10th Jan 2016, 12:23 AM
Yes, it is basically the "lore". The Silmarillion is also a bit like a secular Old Testament to the New Testament that is LOTR. It's style owes a lot to how sacred texts and sagas were written, something it has in common with some of Lord Dunsany's writings. It is in addition very much indebted to the Beowulf saga, the Icelandic Edda and the Finnish Kalevala. He was after all a scholar and professor in that field.
While maybe a tad boring, this is an achievement in itself, however. He is able to maintain this high tone of telling stories that are then larger than life without ever resorting to colloquialisms or losing that tone. One could actually believe that this is an ancient tale that was passed down over countless generations through oral lore and scripture.

If you want to read an example that fails spectacularly in that respect, i.e. losing the tone and thus becoming unconvincing, read the "Mistborn" trilogy by Brian Sanderson. I had to laugh and stop reading for a few days when around the middle of the second book his characters began to say "awesome" on a regular basis.

~MadameButterfly~
10th Jan 2016, 12:44 AM
Lore! Yes! I shoved that word back in an attic somewhere. ~dusts out the cobwebs~

And...I am not sure that I can handle Mistborn characters. They sound like they would crush my soul. First of all, I will forever be allergic to the word 'awesome' thanks to SimGuruRyan, and I most certainly don't want to confront it in a book that should be staying true to its genre.

(The word also reminds me of Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles. I remember having the same reaction when my siblings started parroting those characters around the house.)

GrijzePilion
11th Jan 2016, 3:20 PM
It's a Dutch book, but there's an English translation of it:
Tonke Dragt's De Brief voor De Koning (or The Letter for the King). Read it when I was 13 and loved it. Maybe it's hugely childish, but that book I really quite liked. I'm not too big on books so that's probably all I'd ever recommend.

BloodyScholastic
11th Jan 2016, 6:12 PM
I don't read a lot, this is list of books I had read:
(For more information, simply google it)

Novels:
- "Botchan" by Natsume Soseki
- "The Associate" by John Grisham
- "Casino Royale" by Ian Fleming
- "The Mark" by Jason Pinter
- "The Tale of Despereaux" by Kate DiCamillo
- "Hurricane Gold" by Charlie Higson
- "Arsene Lupin Versus Mafia Maffia" by Maurice LeBlanc
- "The Secret Crusade" Assassin's Creed series by Oliver Bowden
- "The Book of Spies" by Gayle Lynds
- "The Day of Jackal" by Frederick Forsyth
- "Tales of Mystery and Terror" by Edgar Allan Poe
- "Midnight for Charlie Bone" by Jenny Nimmo
- "SilverFin" by Charlie Higson
- "Ice Storm" by Anne Stuart
- "Rage of Angels" by Sidney Sheldon
- "Sherlock Holmes - The Complete Novels and Stories Vol.1" by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
- "The Bourne Identity" by Robert Ludlum
- "Romance of the Three Kingdom" by Luo Guanzhong

I used to read romance girly novels too, to satisfy my curiosity.
- "The Time Traveler's Wife" by Audrey Niffengger
- "The Gift" by Nora Roberts
- "Summer in Seoul" by Ilana Tan (Indonesian author).
- "Twilight" by Stephenie Meyer

Graphic Novels:
- "The Secret of Chimneys" by Agatha Christie
- "Le Sceptre d'Ottokar / King Ottokar's Sceptre" Tintin Adventures by Herge
- "V For Vendetta" by Alan Moore & David Lloyd

Manga (Japanese comics)
Too many of them,
currently my favorites are:
- "Assassination Classroom" by Yusei Matsui
- "Battle Royale" by Koushun Takami & Masayuki Taguchi
- "Death Note" by Tsugumi Ohba & Takeshi Obata
- "Detective Conan" by Gosho Aoyama

Manhua (Hong Kong comics)
- "City of Darkness" by Andy Seto & Yu Er
- "Long Hu Men - The Vengeance Continues" by Tony Wong
- "Master Q" by Alfonso Wong

Sometimes I read motivation books
- "How To Win Friends and Influence People" by Dale Carnegie
- "Talent Is Never Enough" by John C. Maxwell
- "Unlimited Wealth" by Bong Candra (Indonesian motivator)

Current novel book I'm reading:
- "The Negotiator" by Frederick Forsyth

lisfyre
15th Jan 2016, 7:38 PM
OMG!! I just finished all 5 books of The Mortal Instruments. She can't just leave it like that!! I need another 5 books from her to close this story arc... grrrr... I HATE cliffhangers!!! http://yoursmiles.org/tsmile/tears/t2309.gif (http://yoursmiles.org/t-tears.php) http://yoursmiles.org/tsmile/disgust/t9407.gif (http://yoursmiles.org/t-disgust.php)

For those that have not yet read it I won't spoil your pleasure. But frammit... I need more of this story!! Anyone know if she's planning on continuing this?

~MadameButterfly~
24th Jan 2016, 2:45 PM
After reviving my Kindle, what I found were 14 L. Frank Baum books about the Land of Oz. At one point, I had read them all with my son. However, what amused us the most were the letters Baum would write to his readers. Eventually during his career he started telling his readers that the current book that they were holding would be the last, but then, surprise, out popped another book. He was a caged man, and he knew it. The popularity of the Oz books prevented his escape, and in the end he continued working on them up until his death.

tangie0906
24th Jan 2016, 6:55 PM
Hmmmm, this seems like it could be interesting.....The Book Seer (http://bookseer.com/)

SusannaG
24th Jan 2016, 8:25 PM
After reviving my Kindle, what I found were 14 L. Frank Baum books about the Land of Oz. At one point, I had read them all with my son. However, what amused us the most were the letters Baum would write to his readers. Eventually during his career he started telling his readers that the current book that they were holding would be the last, but then, surprise, out popped another book. He was a caged man, and he knew it. The popularity of the Oz books prevented his escape, and in the end he continued working on them up until his death.

He was, really. He wrote a lot of other stuff, but the Oz books sold much better than anything else. So they come out periodically, with multiple year gaps, in the start of the run, and by the teens he's generally turning out one every year.

~MadameButterfly~
24th Jan 2016, 9:39 PM
Nods. I remember telling the kid, "You see, it is possible to become a prisoner by your own creation."

We loved his stories, but we also pitied him.

Misty_2004
6th Feb 2016, 10:04 PM
As with pretty much everything else, my reading tastes are eclectic and don't stick to any one genre. I love mystery and intrigue. I love historical fiction. I love fantasy. As long as the writer isn't prone to self-insertion and creating a bunch of Mary Sue characters (and Mary Higgins Clark I'm pointing my finger at you here because way too many of your characters are a hair away from being Mary Sues) and the story is without smut and filth I'm good.

Of course we love Terry Pratchett in our house but I've never read all his books.

I also get the biggest kick out of John Grisham's works. He has at least one or two more out that I haven't read so I need to make sure to look out for them in thrift shops. That's where I get most of my reading materials since I prefer paper books but don't want to spend a lot of money on them.

Naturally, I've also read the entire Dune series but once past the first books it jumped the shark for me.

I have not managed ever to read the Silmarillion. I bought it years and years ago after I read LotR and ultimately one of the kids wanted to look at it and I haven't seen it since.

One time we made an accidental discovery of a children's book set. On our property there's a hole that for some reason or other relatives think is a garbage pit (which really irks me) and one of the in-laws' friends was moving and had given her a bunch of stuff to donate to a thrift shop. Well, instead of donating it she tossed it all in that pit. One of my kids was out on a walk and found all the stuff. She hauled all of it to the house and in that mess was a slightly warped autographed copy of Fable Haven by Brandon Mull. It looked interesting so I started reading. It was interesting so I finished it. Then I passed it along to my son and he read it. After that we ended up buying the rest of the series. They are written for older children but are great light reading for adults too.

I'm also a fan of Agatha Christie. I think I managed to finally get all her books after the internet and I could find a steady supply of used paperbacks.

My favorite author of all time has to be James Michener. Goodness that man could weave together a story! I got hooked on him when I was but a teenager and watched "Hawaii" on TV. Well into my adulthood I found the book at a thrift shop and over the years have picked up almost everything he ever wrote. Right now I'm reading Poland which although is much dryer than some of his other stories is still a worthy read and I completely understand why he wanted to write it. It gives a look into European history that I had only ever seen portrayed from other angles.