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Field Researcher
Original Poster
#1 Old 20th Oct 2011 at 1:25 PM
Default Disappearing gadgets by the year 2020
This is an article I read...
http://shopping.yahoo.com/articles/...-around-in-2020
So what do you guys think? Can you imagine video games that are actually a smart television combined with the technology of the video console?
Can you image everything being digital? meaning that hard copies of games like for example the sims 3 and expansions wouldn't exist? how do you feel about these things?
Fucking Awesome Nutbag
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20th Oct 2011 at 2:14 PM
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Lab Assistant
#2 Old 20th Oct 2011 at 2:30 PM
I'm sort of resistant to change, so I'm really wary about the idea of not having consoles anymore.Then again, if all games are available for all players with a good PC and some sort of smart television, that might work out better for the player in general.

Still, between hating change and being dead broke, I always feel like I'll be behind the curve on this sort of stuff. I'm still struggling to accept the idea of buying MP3s instead of CDs for music!
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#3 Old 20th Oct 2011 at 2:40 PM
Not unless Microsoft, Sony, and Nintendo merge (or stop manufacturing their products), or people want to have a separate tv for each manufacturer's games.

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Field Researcher
Original Poster
#4 Old 20th Oct 2011 at 2:45 PM
I forgot about that HystericalParoxysm. I wasn't thinking about how the fact there is three different companies which is weird since I play video games often enough.
I kind of like having hard copies of certain things... I mean if everything is digital if the electricity goes out we are doomed.... well with technology anyways...
Lab Assistant
#5 Old 20th Oct 2011 at 2:57 PM
I'm like Kristie, I like having hard copies. It's too easy to lose a digital copy of most anything. If the computer dies and you weren't able to back up the media you've pretty much lost a lot of money through something that can happen to anyone because computers don't last forever. Until they find a way to either make computers indestructible, or digital copies easier to re-download I'll stick with hard copies.
Lab Assistant
#6 Old 20th Oct 2011 at 3:45 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by EliDawn
I'm like Kristie, I like having hard copies. It's too easy to lose a digital copy of most anything. If the computer dies and you weren't able to back up the media you've pretty much lost a lot of money through something that can happen to anyone because computers don't last forever. Until they find a way to either make computers indestructible, or digital copies easier to re-download I'll stick with hard copies.


Yeah, that's my main issue with digital downloads. I don't feel like I really "own" something unless I have a physical copy in my hands, and I've had too many computers die on me without me backing up certain things. (although I've usually had luck redownloading stuff from the companies I purchased things...but that's because they've been big companies like iTunes and Steam. What happens if I download something from a small company and they go out of business? I'd be out of luck.)
Scholar
#7 Old 20th Oct 2011 at 6:25 PM
I don't like digital-only copies of games because I want to actually have some sort of ownership of things I purchase. I want to be able to reinstall a game if my computer dies, I want to be able to play a game without going through some sort of digital game loader (though, unfortunately, there are some physical copies of games that still require things like Steam to run), and I want to be able to sell my games if I don't want them anymore. Video game companies don't like this because they want to be able to sell as many copies as possible with as small a second-hand market as possible, but I, as a customer, demand that I be able to choose to sell my games if I decide that they suck too much. This is why I almost never buy digital copies of games and will only register games that I'm absolutely sure I want to keep. It irks me that some game publishers are moving to a format where you have to sign in to their servers just to play the game. That means that I can't even play a single player game if I'm in an area with a sucky connection and, if the company's servers go down, I'm out of luck. This very thing happened earlier this year with Dragon Age: Origins, where no one was able to play because the game required logging in and the Bioware servers went down. I think they changed it so that you don't have to be logged in, but that was one of the few things that irked me about that game.

I don't consider myself a luddite by any means, but I think that our society is moving to relying too heavily on digital data storage. First of all, the internet is not and never will be as secure as physical storage, so the fact that bank accounts and other sensitive information is largely manipulated over the internet now is somewhat foolish, in my mind. Yes, it's more convenient, but sometimes it's better to go that extra mile and choose a more secure option. Further, we don't know that the internet will be around forever. If our society eventually moves on, our descendants will have lost so much of the historical record, not only from the modern period, but also from older historical periods. There was recently a Cracked article that talked about how all kinds of books, even old, historically priceless ones, are being burned now simply because libraries can't afford to keep them. The only thing standing in the way of losing the information in those books forever is digital scans of the books. So what happens if our society begins to neglect internet infrastructure? We permanently lose large swaths of the historical record.

I don't know what the chances of our society losing its digital records are, but, given what we know of history, nothing lasts forever. Wars happen, natural disasters happen, and stupidity happens, leaving even the most brilliant technologies and structures open to destruction.
Alchemist
#8 Old 20th Oct 2011 at 8:47 PM
I agree with what others have said about physically owning something. I'm sort of a visual person, I like looking at my bookshelf and seeing my heavily used books. As cheesy as it sounds I do really like physical books better, I think tablets are uncomfortable to read from and I like the touch/smell of a book. I'll use a tablet occasionally simply because it's more convenient but otherwise no. I don't like being at the mercy of a huge company either. If I buy a video game it's mine, I can play it, sell it, share it, lick it, whatever.

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