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Replies: 9 (Who?), Viewed: 3319 times. | Locked by: ellacharm3d Reason: answered
Lab Assistant
Original Poster
#1 Old 5th Apr 2012 at 7:00 PM
Default I really need help - regarding Graphics Card
Hi all,

I have recently bought a new graphics card with my own money, and after weeks of research I succumbed and just brought The Sims 3: Pets case (for game requirments) and info of my computer specs to PC World and yesterday they gave me this card: AMD Radeon HD 6450.

I have it now in front of me, but I am refusing to open it, in case I cannot return it. So, I just want to ask will this card be good enough to run The Sims 3 (with most EPs & a few SPs) on med-high settings? Here's my dxdiag:





.. I would really appreciate if someone could respond to this, because I don't think I can last any longer before I rip open that box and see if it really works!

Thanks
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Née whiterider
staff: administrator
#2 Old 5th Apr 2012 at 7:28 PM
No, that graphics card isn't good enough to play Pets - you'll see that it's listed as a "Maybe" for basegame and World Adventures, and an absolute "No" for anything later, here: Game Help:TS3 System Requirementswiki. If you're looking for new graphics cards, those with "Yes" all the way across are good ones to buy.

That computer overall isn't great for sims. Your CPU isn't amazing, but it's good enough. However, using a 32-bit version of Windows limits how much memory (RAM) you can use. Luckily, you don't need as much RAM to play Sims 3 on Windows XP as you do on Vista or Windows 7. But I'll tell you this anyway, just so you know: even if you get a great graphics card, you'll still get some slowness/lag/jerkiness/other performance problems with newer Sims 3 EPs. Mind you, you get some performance problems even on amazing computers - that's just the way Sims 3 is.

Did you make sure that your power supply (PSU) is strong enough to run that graphics card? If you didn't, make sure you do check that before buying any more graphics cards in future - since I assume you will now want to take that one back to the shop.

What I lack in decorum, I make up for with an absence of tact.
Lab Assistant
Original Poster
#3 Old 5th Apr 2012 at 7:45 PM
Wow - thank you for such a quick reply

Hmm. Okay. Phew! - that I did not open it yet. Sorry, but what do you mean by my power supply? And yes, I will definitely bring this gaphics card back.

You'll have to forgive me that I'm so illiterate when it comes to all this stuff - I know the very basics - but when it comes to this stage, I'm lost. So, you're saying that, essentially, I should really have a better CPU? And then I should decide on a graphics card? Because, even now when I attempt to play this game on low settings it is rather jerky - but it has always been like that, even before I got more RAM. Considering that this whole thing may costmore money than I had hoped, I think I'll get a new digital camera instead.

Well, thank you for your help! :D
Lab Assistant
#4 Old 6th Apr 2012 at 1:39 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Conorsim
Wow - thank you for such a quick reply

Hmm. Okay. Phew! - that I did not open it yet. Sorry, but what do you mean by my power supply? And yes, I will definitely bring this gaphics card back.

You'll have to forgive me that I'm so illiterate when it comes to all this stuff - I know the very basics - but when it comes to this stage, I'm lost. So, you're saying that, essentially, I should really have a better CPU? And then I should decide on a graphics card? Because, even now when I attempt to play this game on low settings it is rather jerky - but it has always been like that, even before I got more RAM. Considering that this whole thing may costmore money than I had hoped, I think I'll get a new digital camera instead.

Well, thank you for your help! :D

Here's me, attempting to use my *very* newfound computer knowledge on you!

The power supply (and forgive me if this sounds overly basic) is the metal box inside your computer that you actually plug the power cable into. Most higher powered video cards require at least a 500W PSU to run safely, and many pre-built computers come with weaker PSUs that can't supply enough power. The old Dell I have, for example, came with a 375W PSU. To check, you can either look it up in your computer's spec sheet (google the model number!), or you can open your case and look for the label on the PSU. A good 500W PSU will probably cost at least ~$50, and depending on what else you were to upgrade, you might even want a bigger one.

As far as the CPU thing, I think what whiterider was pointing out is that even if you buy the best GPU you can afford, it can only be as good as your CPU. Like if you put the world's fastest tires (is that even a thing?) on a car with a terrible engine, it can only improve your speed and handling so much. Does that make sense?

I'll step aside and let the experts take over, but hopefully this was a little bit helpful—or at least not incorrect!
Née whiterider
staff: administrator
#5 Old 6th Apr 2012 at 8:07 AM
Yep, that pretty much covers it. The focus of the 'only as good as' bit was the RAM, rather than the CPU, though it applies to both really.

What I lack in decorum, I make up for with an absence of tact.
Lab Assistant
Original Poster
#6 Old 6th Apr 2012 at 12:04 PM
@Margonaute - thank you! I get the jist now. I would love to know more about computers but it's just knowing where to start... :P

Well, I think I'll wait now until I definitely know what I'm doing and what I'm getting. I'm just about to return the graphics card, and I am thinking about bringing my CPU into them and enquiring about what could be done. Ah sure, I'll see ... I may not get it done at all ... a camera is very tempting ...

But anyway, thank you both for your help!
In the Arena
staff: senior moderator
#7 Old 6th Apr 2012 at 2:23 PM
I'd ask the same questions of you I ask everyone:

- what monitor size do you use, and would you be using this same monitor for the next 2 years?
- what resolution do you game on?
- is saving more money (albeit over a longer time) to get all new components better for you in the long term (ie you can afford the wait) or getting some quick fix now is the only option (as you need to use the PC and improved components rightaway)? I mean which is a better prospect for your current situation: longer wait for newer components (or new PC altogether) or you need the replacement urgently because otherwise the PC is not usable at this stage in time? And you need a working PC for work, school, whatever.

With the understanding that buying components piecemeal for replacements, means the other components may start failing. 4-5 years is a long time in the PC component world. In my experience, when one item needs replacement, the others are in the queue for replacements, too. So it is cheaper in that case, to replace the whole kit and caboodle in one go.
Because for one, finding older parts to match any old(er) motherboard is difficult - items are out of stock or more expensive than current generations' choices. For another, the support you get for these items are not guaranteed, even worse if you get refurbished or 2nd-hand stuff.

One way to start is by reading lots - especially the links I throw in the threads - the ones on these pages or in Archives. Target the ones that have lots of views/replies.
And asking questions, of course.
Lab Assistant
Original Poster
#8 Old 7th Apr 2012 at 6:35 PM
Hi ellacharm3d

I know this may be slightly stubborn (of me) but I spent the money that I saved for the graphics card on a digital camera instead. Getting that graphics card really was my last try - I've been saving up for the past three years, I've gotten around 3GBs of extra RAM with that money saved up, and I just managed to save up more for the graphics card. But now that I see there's a long more way to go to play TS3 at its best, I simply give up. I have spent way too much money on this series anyway, even though I hardly play it anymore.

This old computer will do fine until I go to college, which will be about another 2 years. Hopefully I can save up enough til then and maybe even chance at getting a better part-time job so I can really go all-out on a new PC/Laptop - maybe the ol' parents will help out too :P

Thank you all ever-so-much for the help, but after stepping back I really don't see or feel the need to update this compy ... I've had it for what..? Five years now. But it is much older than that. Once I finish up my work with CAW ~ I won't have to worry about nothin' no more

In the Arena
staff: senior moderator
#9 Old 7th Apr 2012 at 6:52 PM
FWIW, I think you made the right decision. Personally I wouldn't upgrade a system that is older than 4 years, but I understand circumstances are not ideal for everyone, so we adjust as we can.
In 2 years, with the money you could save up from now till then, you may get a better PC with better components at a cheaper price with the way technology advances. So you may end up in the win column, after all. Especially with the prospect of college needing a higher spec'd machine than what you can get now at current market prices.

If you don't have further questions on this, we can tag this as resolved and Archive it.
Lab Assistant
Original Poster
#10 Old 7th Apr 2012 at 7:02 PM
Yes, exactly. And even in 2 years time I may know more about computers than I do now (Hopefully, ROFL) so I'll be well prepared when getting a new system.

No, I've no further questions. Again, thanks for the help!
 
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