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Theme Seasons and Celebrations - posted on 1st Oct 2017 at 1:52 PM
Replies: 75 (Who?), Viewed: 33919 times.
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Scholar
#26 Old 18th Dec 2014 at 7:02 AM
Many things that are now considered "women's things" such as make-up, high heels, skirts, shawls, lace, wigs, etc were originally designed for men, and it was quite a scandal for women to wear them. Men only stopped wearing them because the women started to.

Sarcasm is a body's natural defense against stupid.
Top Secret Researcher
#27 Old 18th Dec 2014 at 7:57 PM
Society can't "allow" men to wear makeup, because "allow" implies that society has a right to say they can't. Society cannot - or SHOULDN'T - be able to say what people can do with their own bodies, as long as it doesn't involve hurting someone else. Which makeup does not. Perfume, on the other hand...
Now what dammit?
staff: moderator
#28 Old 18th Dec 2014 at 9:26 PM
Society can't do anything actually because Society is not a person.

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Thread for yakking about making TS2 stuff
Theorist
#29 Old 19th Dec 2014 at 4:29 AM
You don't need to be a person to do things. There's all sorts of explicitly more abstract notions than "people" that are perfectly capable of doing stuff, including ruining your day. Just because society doesn't have an address, doesn't mean it's not an ass.
Lab Assistant
Original Poster
#30 Old 19th Dec 2014 at 5:04 AM
Society can have an impact in what people think is right or wrong, and affect their opinions about it, too.

“Everybody shut up!”-Sherlock
Now what dammit?
staff: moderator
#31 Old 19th Dec 2014 at 11:09 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mistermook
You don't need to be a person to do things. There's all sorts of explicitly more abstract notions than "people" that are perfectly capable of doing stuff, including ruining your day. Just because society doesn't have an address, doesn't mean it's not an ass.

Yeah but it's hard to characterise society as one thing isn't it? Particularly one thing that has an opinion.

Polgannon: Who Murdered Blaise Penhaligan?
(3rd ed. neighbourhood now available with corrections). Poll: http://strawpoll.me/6689876

Polls: length of neighbourhood play: http://www.strawpoll.me/10908815 & http://www.strawpoll.me/10908842

Thread for yakking about making TS2 stuff
Theorist
#32 Old 19th Dec 2014 at 4:27 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by maxon
Yeah but it's hard to characterise society as one thing isn't it? Particularly one thing that has an opinion.

Not really. I mean, there's peoples whose academic and professional careers are devoted to the notion. Everyone from stock brokers, sociologists, anthropologists, marketing folks, and publishers - it's really all about trying to put your finger on the pulse of a group of people are determining what they think, sometimes even before they realize what they're thinking. Or manipulating what society thinks as a whole, convincing people they need Cabbage Patch dolls and rap music.

I think you're mistaking the fact that societies can have opinions and bad attitudes for the problem that there is not one society, or at least that figuring out the little subspecies of society is a lot easier to get a handle on than "all humanity, everywhere." Once you break things down and look for people with similarities, people stop acting like individuals a little. Not entirely comforting I guess.
Now what dammit?
staff: moderator
#33 Old 19th Dec 2014 at 8:43 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mistermook
Not really. I mean, there's peoples whose academic and professional careers are devoted to the notion.

Yes, that would be mine. I'm being far more literal than you are realising.

Polgannon: Who Murdered Blaise Penhaligan?
(3rd ed. neighbourhood now available with corrections). Poll: http://strawpoll.me/6689876

Polls: length of neighbourhood play: http://www.strawpoll.me/10908815 & http://www.strawpoll.me/10908842

Thread for yakking about making TS2 stuff
Theorist
#34 Old 19th Dec 2014 at 11:55 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by maxon
Yes, that would be mine. I'm being far more literal than you are realising.

Ah. So...threadcrapping. Gotcha.
Inventor
#35 Old 21st Dec 2014 at 6:58 PM
Yes, because people shouldn't worry about what others wear on their faces. There are much bigger problems to worry about than if a man wears make up or not. If you see someone in public that is wearing something you don't like there is an extremely simple solution: turn your head. I do this all the time, because I have no right to tell others what to wear.


I would also like to say that I think it is wrong to try to tell someone else what they can and can't do to their face. or shun them for it. Example: I hate facial piercings and would never have one myself (same with earrings on men), but I would never try to stop someone else from getting one or shun them for having/getting one. I would simply keep my opinion to myself.
Guest
#36 Old 14th Jan 2015 at 2:50 AM
I think anything someone else does that doesn't "pick my pocket or break my leg", as Thomas Jefferson put it, is not any of my business. Just don't act all offended and hurt if I act surprised.
Scholar
#37 Old 24th Jan 2015 at 6:51 PM
I actually think men can look really attractive in make-up. Most of my sims wear plenty of make-up, as do the members of my favourite band. The only thing I'm not keen on is when men who have facial hair wear make-up. It just looks wrong to me. But then I don't really like facial hair. I'd keep it to myself though..

I don't think anyone has the right to make someone feel bad for the way they want to express themselves.

It's ironic that a lot of answers are criticising women for wearing 'too much' make-up. When I used to go on a night out, I would wear loads of make-up, heels and short skirts (back when I had the figure for it), and I got so much stick for it, from people telling me "Just be yourself, wear jeans and trainers", well guess what, jeans and trainers are not me. I don't go round telling you that you look plain.
Theorist
#39 Old 20th Feb 2015 at 12:32 AM
Why do we actually have to care if men wear make-up? Let them, if they want to....

The gorgeous Tina (TS3) and here loving family available for download here.
Lab Assistant
#40 Old 27th Mar 2015 at 4:34 AM
guys usually end up looking ridiculous in make-up. perhaps y'all should get some proper foundation/blush/eyeliners and then we'll talk.
Scholar
#41 Old 27th Mar 2015 at 5:59 AM
@Vinathi, A lot of people look ridiculous in makeup. When I first got my glasses and was getting used to seeing clearly again, I was astounded at how bad most women looked due to what I could only guess was utter cluelessness about how to wear it combined with a deep conviction that they must wear it. Suffice it to say that all those two-toned necks, cracking-plastered cheeks, and way-too-obvious contouring lines inspired me to do some serious research before making my desire to wear makeup into reality.
I'm female in body and chromosomes, but due to a restrictive father who didn't want his little girl tarting herself up, declaring that I would go out of the house in lipstick and eyeshadow when I pleased was pretty tough for a while -- I was 18 before I was willing to put up with the flack enough to actually wear more than lightly tinted glitter-gloss stuff that nobody really noticed. My mother hasn't worn makeup since she retired, and it was always the standard career-woman mask before then, so I had to learn from the library and YouTube how to wear what I wanted...which was inspired by drag queens, who I'd been fascinated by since I saw Dana International on the Eurovision Contest. Looking back, I can see there were some horrible flubs, but I learned how to, yes, even wear black lipstick and cream eyeshadows properly. (Not at the same time, and the latter requires a primer and dusting of matching powder shadow to set it if there's any chance of humidity.) I doubt I could have managed it if I'd had the disapproval of society applied to my successes as well as my failures, however!

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Test Subject
#42 Old 5th Apr 2015 at 8:01 AM
I think people should be allowed to wear anything as long it is not hurting anyone ( by that racisim )
And while I'm talking about clothes, the reason miley Cyrus wears well, you know is to show the world she has matured and she doesn't want to be known as Hannah Montana forever.
Lab Assistant
#43 Old 12th Apr 2015 at 9:38 AM
I'm 60% sure this is a troll question.

How and why should/would/could 'society' 'allow' men not/to wear makeup?

IMO however, all men look great naturally.
Test Subject
#44 Old 15th Apr 2015 at 7:50 PM
Actually you are allowed to wear make-up, but by doing that people will either think that you're a clown, a gay man or even a drag queen. I know society is fucked up, but there's nothing really that states that men can't use make up, you can do it just don't get offended if people want to verbally or even physically hurt you (they're just closeminded dicks).
Alchemist
#45 Old 15th Apr 2015 at 8:41 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by EnglishMuffin
Actually you are allowed to wear make-up, but by doing that people will either think that you're a clown, a gay man or even a drag queen. I know society is fucked up, but there's nothing really that states that men can't use make up, you can do it just don't get offended if people want to verbally or even physically hurt you (they're just closeminded dicks).


Do you hear yourself?

"The more you know, the sadder you get."~ Stephen Colbert
"Science literacy is a vaccine against the charlatans of the world that would exploit your ignorance."~ Neil DeGrasse Tyson
"I'm not going to censor myself to comfort your ignorance." ~ Jon Stewart
Test Subject
#46 Old 15th Apr 2015 at 8:42 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by SuicidiaParasidia
Do you hear yourself?


I am sorry if you misinterpretated me. I really didn't mean to come off as a douchebag or anything. What I meant was, seeing how this society is, he should be prepared to face off all kind of offences he might come across with.
Alchemist
#47 Old 15th Apr 2015 at 8:54 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by EnglishMuffin
I am sorry if you misinterpretated me. I really didn't mean to come off as a douchebag or anything. What I meant was, seeing how this society is, he should be prepared to face off all kind of offences he might come across with.


Yeah, no, I get it...it's just that, that's more or less exactly what people say about stuff like...gay people...and sexual assault. "If you're going to wear that short skirt, you should expect guys to abuse you by calling you misogynistic terms or physically hurting you" or, "You can be gay, just know that your community will hate you and possibly attempt to hurt you". Do you see the problem that I'm pointing out, now? Shitty behavior should not be anticipated, and in being expected and brushed off as normal, it's being condoned and excused as an acceptable outcome.

It's not on the person who makes the harmless decision to be themselves to avoid insult or injury, it's on the people who react with insults and violence.

"The more you know, the sadder you get."~ Stephen Colbert
"Science literacy is a vaccine against the charlatans of the world that would exploit your ignorance."~ Neil DeGrasse Tyson
"I'm not going to censor myself to comfort your ignorance." ~ Jon Stewart
Test Subject
#48 Old 15th Apr 2015 at 9:01 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by SuicidiaParasidia
Yeah, no, I get it...it's just that, that's more or less exactly what people say about stuff like...gay people...and sexual assault. "If you're going to wear that short skirt, you should expect guys to abuse you by calling you misogynistic terms or physically hurting you" or, "You can be gay, just know that your community will hate you and possibly attempt to hurt you". Do you see the problem that I'm pointing out, now? Shitty behavior should not be anticipated, and in being expected and brushed off as normal, it's being condoned and excused as an acceptable outcome.

It's not on the person who makes the harmless decision to be themselves to avoid insult or injury, it's on the people who react with insults and violence.


I completely understand that, I myself am gay and I totally get it what it is like to be called a f**** and so on. I was just trying to say that society might try to hurt you because you are not living by society's standards. My cousin wears a jeans and even her gets growled at and gets called "delicious, or a babe" and I know it is embarassing.

It's pretty much those intolerant people that have no respect for others, so it's not his fault at all for wanting to wear make up. Or not the woman's fault because she's wearing a super short mini-skirt.
Instructor
#49 Old 16th Apr 2015 at 10:36 AM
It's all about relativity though.

If you are a guy living in a big city (New York, London and so on) people wouldn't give a damn about you wearing concealer, foundation or mascara.
If you are a guy living in a very conservative country town, you might be made fun of just because you carry hand cream in your backpack.
I've personally used some foundation or concealer in the past to cover imperfections (when I used to shave my face daily) but I don't use it anymore. I think us boys have the great gift of facial hair, which is in my opinion the best way to hide pimples or blemishes, and facial hair doesn't work very well with makeup... I also have this feeling that makeup doesn't let the skin breathe properly, and since I take very good care of my sensitive skin I would rather keep it clean, soft and healthy without anything "sitting" on top of it.

I would also like to address the topic of advertisement in magazines and TV. Girls see models and actresses with a perfect body, perfect skin, glossy lips, full eyelashes and blushy cheeks, perfect skin and perfect long hair. We boys also have a very good deal of body image pressure, less than girls obviously, but still we should spend 6 days a week in the gym to look like 90% of actors and male models. On the other hand, ads addressed to men usually show generic hair and clear skin. A guy that "wants to look like a celebrity" or that wants to enhance his handsomeness doesnt need lipstick, fake eyelashes, blush or eyeshadow, whereas a girl does.

Me, me, me against them, me against enemies, me against friends, somehow they all seem to become one, a sea full of sharks and they all smell blood.
Mad Poster
#50 Old 16th Apr 2015 at 12:19 PM
Gabrymato, considering how a lot of those models and actresses look like when they peel off their multiple layers of makeup, I'm with you on makeup not letting the skin breathe. Some of them are hardly even recognizble without makeup, and look at least ten years older. This also goes for a lot of the not famous girls who wear a lot of makeup.

I get it that some people might feel more confident with makeup on, both girls and boys. I'm a girl, and personally I have never used makeup regularly, only for very rare occations. My skin is 'smooth as a baby's butt' I guess you could say. I actually feel less at ease with makeup on, as if I'm trying to hide behind a mask that isn't me. Plus, makeup itches, taste weird (reason why I never wear lipstick), and with it on I feel it sticks to everything. I'm probably one of the few girls who feel less confident with makeup on...

I always find it funny when you get those huge numbers out of some more or less famous blogger showing pictures of themselves without makeup, as if it is such a big thing. After all, they're just taking off their mask and showing their true face, something I personally think a lot more people need to do. For most people, makeup only tricks the confidence into believing you need makeup to show yourself in public.

Anyway, makeup should be a personal choice whether you're a boy or a girl. Maybe the question shouldn't be 'should society allow men to wear makeup?', but 'should society allow people to show their natural beauty without multiple layers of makeup?'. I'm more curious on that debate.
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